Cognitive neuroscientist Meg Schlichting’s memory research could change the way we teach students

January 1, 2018 by Janice Liu

Margaret (Meg) Schlichting, who joined the Psychology faculty in January of last year, has been recognized by the Faculty of Arts & Science by their "Rising Stars" series. Meg's important research, done by her Budding Minds Lab, focuses on memories - how we form them, how we recall them and how we use them when making new choices - with special emphasis on how processing new information with existing memories can deepen learning and support complex decision making. Meg and her fellow researchers are especially interested in how children, teenagers and adults might accomplish this processing differently due to developmental differences in their brain’s structure and function. Meg envisions that the results could be used to positively influence children who are struggling with certain tasks by finding the problem and providing strategies to overcome these obstacles. Read more about Meg's research at the Faculty of Arts & Science "Rising Stars" page at https://news.artsci.utoronto.ca/all-news/our-community/meg-schlichting-change-way-teens-learn/. And see more about Meg's rising star in the news item below!

Congratulations to St. George faculty member Margaret (Meg) Schlichting. Meg was recently named one of the 2017 Association for Psychological Science (APS) Rising Stars. A full list of Rising Stars, including Meg, Brett Ford (UTSC) and Jennifer Stellar (UTM) is available at http://www.psychologicalscience.org/redesign/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/2017-Rising-Stars.pdf. Meg conducts research on how the brain supports the formation, modification, and use of knowledge from a developmental perspective using cognitive neuroscience techniques.
 

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